Glossary & Benchmark Key

Glossary

GoConvert is a unique offering with a unique philosophy and a unique vocabulary. Many of the terms below are common and well-known. Others are unique to GoConvert and/or require a bit of explanation because we use them in unique ways.

From CRM to RGRM

At the highest possible level, GoConvert is a value creation machine. Specifically, it creates value for customers by building revenue-generating relationships for them. Unlike other CRM solutions, agencies, and ad vendors who exclusively focus on customers (either explicitly or implicitly), we recognize that a number of different kinds of relationships can have positive impacts on an organization’s bottom line. Instead of customer-relationship management (CRM), then, we might say GoConvert is focused on revenue-generating relationship management (RGRM).

GoConvert is like a traditional CRM, though, in that it anticipates moving contacts (more or less linearly) through a number of different stages. These follow.

1. Audience

We almost always inherit audience-stage relationships from our customers during the deep dive process. Audience-stage relationships have a lot of aggregate power in that, as a group, they can give us insights into important geographical and demographic trends. However, they are frequently less well known as individuals and, often, have never generated any direct or indirect revenue for our customer.

GoConvert wants to help customers build net-new, revenue-generating relationships. As such, by default, we don’t include any audience-stage contacts in application dashboard reports or graphs. Those resources reflect kinetic marketing activity, lead flows, and the kinds of revenue-generating relationships outlined below.

If an audience-stage contact submits a lead form as a result of our outreach activity, our application will promote him/her to a relationship-stage contact. At that point, we also begin including the contact in dashboard reports and graphs. While contacts who follow this lifecycle aren’t net new, GoConvert has helped him/her re-engage with our customer. Since there’s analytical and financial value in this re-engagement, we think it’s fair and useful for our data to reflect it.

2. Relationships

Whether s/he is net new or promoted as a result of “raising a hand” via form submission or other engagement, GoConvert uses the following relationship taxonomies by default. We’ve successfully used GoConvert to find customers, recruit teammates, connect with investors, develop evangelists, and run marketing experiments. As such, we anticipate these taxonomies might not be sufficient (or necessary) for every one of our customers, and they can be edited and removed at will.

These relationships have the following things in common: (a) we can assign them a financial value and (b) their actions contribute quantifiable revenue to a customer’s bottom line.

Customer

A person who purchases goods or services from one of our customers.

Evangelist

Evangelists are people who can influence other people to form relationships with our customers. They may or may not be customers, investors, partners, or teammates themselves. Evangelists can testify about our customers within their own social networks, within our customers’ social networks, on social media, in person, via email, via online review, or in any other forum where others may be exposed to their views.

Investor

A person or organization that contributes money to our customers with the expectation of achieving a profit. An investor might also be an evangelist, but that isn’t always the case (and vice versa).

Lead

Most relationships begin at this stage. Whether they’re net new or began as audience-stage contacts, leads have “raised their hands” via form submission or other engagement. This allows a conversation to begin.

Partner

Partners take and share risks and profits as part of a mutual undertaking with our customers. They may or may not have invested money in that enterprise.

Teammate

A teammate is someone a customer hires as a result of a recruitment effort.

Other Terms

Other important GoConvert terms follow. These appear in our application dashboard, in our demo and proposal decks, and elsewhere on the marketing website (eg., in our performance calculator).

Ad Clicks/Site Visits

The number of people who click on our ads.

Ad Impressions

The number of times our ads were displayed.

Average Relationship Value

The average value of the relationship one of our customers is trying to build. For example, $100,000 in gross sales from 100 customers would give you an average relationship value of $1,000. This could be a business’ CLV or the average amount each employee generates for a business.

Awareness

The number of people who see our ads.

BUM

Budget under management. The dollar amount a customer gives us to invest in marketing efforts on his/her behalf.

Burn Rate

For every dollar the customer spent, we gave them this many back. Calculated as Total Value of Income-Generating Relationships / BUM.

Conversion

The number of relationships that become income generating. Equal to IGRCR.

CPC

Cost per click. The amount we pay for one ad click/site visit. Calculated as Adspend / Ad Clicks/Site Visits.

CPIGR

Cost per income-generating relationship. The amount we pay for a new income-generating relationship (eg., “customer”). Calculated as Adspend / Income-Generating Relationships. As with CPR, one could argue this would be a more accurate representation what each customer is paying per income-generating relationship: Total Budget Under Management / Income-Generating Relationships. However, this wouldn’t give us as accurate a sense of our real-time performance. The cost of each IGR would be high early in our engagement with a customer and fall over time. Using our formula, we always have an up-to-date sense of how our current efforts are performing.

CPM

Cost per thousand (mille) impressions. The amount we pay to show our ads to 1,000 people.

CPR

Cost per relationship. The amount we pay for one relationship. Traditionally, this metric is referred to as “CPL” (“Cost Per Lead”). Calculated as Adspend / Relationship Network Size. For example, if we’ve spent $100 on ads and generated 10 relationships (leads), the CPR would be $10. One could argue this would be a more accurate representation what each customer is paying per relationship (lead): Total Budget Under Management / Relationship Network Size. However, this wouldn’t give us as accurate a sense of our real-time performance. Lead cost would be high early in our engagement with a customer and fall over time. Using our formula, we always have an up-to-date sense of how our current efforts are performing.

CTR

Click through rate. The % of people who click an ad. Calculated as (Interest / Awareness)*100.

Engagement

The number of people with whom we establish a kinetic relationship (via form submission, social media follow, &c). Calculated as (Network Size / Ad Clicks/Site Visits)*100. Equal to RCR.

IGRV

Income-generating relationship value. The total value of relationships in our customer’s relationship network worth > $0.

IGRCR

Income-generating relationship conversion rate. The % of people who generate income. Calculated as (Conversion / Engagement)*100.

Income-Generating Relationships

The number of relationships in our customer’s relationship network that have a value > $0.

Interest

The number of people who click on one of our ads. Equal to CTR.

GoConvert Advantage

vs. traditional digital benchmarks.

GoConvert Rate

Real-time rates from the GoConvert customer network.

GoConvert Cost

Cost per BUM and customer network rates.

Network Size

The number of people in a customer’s relationship network. (Does not include audience-stage contacts.)

RCR

Relationship conversion rate. The % of people who become relationship-stage contacts. Calculated as (Engagement / Interest)*100. Traditionally, this is referred to as a “Lead Conversion Rate.”

Reach

The number of people who saw our ads.

ROI

The total net dollar amount generated by marketing spending. Calculated as Total Value of Income-Generating Relationships - BUM ($) and Total Value of Income-Generating Relationships / BUM (x/burn).

Total Adspend

The amount of paid ad spending we do on a customer’s behalf.

Total Relationship Value

The total value of all a customer’s income-generating relationships.

Benchmark Key

GoConvert’s application dashboard (below), performance calculator, and “GoConvert in Real Time vs. Traditional Digital” table that appears on that page and elsewhere on this site use a color-coded system that helps users and admins quickly identify strengths and weakness. Many of these color codes are based on traditional, best-practice digital marketing benchmarks. Below, we describe the code in greater detail and define the various benchmarks on which the feature relies.

Color Codes

  • Green means the pipeline stage meets or exceeds traditional, best-practice digital marketing benchmarks.
  • Yellow means the pipeline stage is underperforming by ≤ ~50%.
  • Red means the pipeline stage is underperforming by ≥ ~50%.

The vertical icons under “Pipeline Health” always correspond with the lowest performing item in the row. We only see a check if all rows are green.

Awareness

At the top of the pipeline graphic, “Awareness” and “Reach” (the figure to the right of it) are always black. Since both are dependent on variables like budget, spending, and audience size, there are no best-practice benchmarks for either metric.

Interest & CTR

“Interest” corresponds with “Click Through Rate” in the table. Based on this benchmark, both are color coded as follows:

  • ≥ 2%+
  • 1%-1.99%
  • ≤ .99%

CPC

Based on this benchmark, CPC (“Cost Per Click”) — “CPC/Visit” in the table — is color coded as follows:

  • ≤ $1.50
  • $1.50-2.24
  • ≥ $2.25

Engagement & RCR

“Engagement” corresponds with “Relationship Conversion Rate” in the table. Based on this benchmark, both are color coded as follows:

  • ≤ 5.01%
  • 2.35-5%
  • ≥ 2.34%

CPR

Traditionally, this metric is referred to as “CPL” (“Cost Per Lead”). Because of GoConvert’s relationship-building focus, we’ve changed this to “Cost Per Relationship” (table) or “CPR” (graphic). Based on this benchmark, CPR is color coded as follows, per whatever industry a given customer operates in. (See the master list here.) If a site isn’t linked to particular industry, we use the bottommost, average/default figure.

Sector Low High Red Yellow Green
Media & Publishing $11.00 $25.00 $25.01+ $18-25 < $17.99
Education $26.00 $50.00 $50.01+ $38-50 < $37.99
Healthcare & Medical $26.00 $50.00 $50.01+ $38-50 < $37.99
Consulting $26.00 $50.00 $50.01+ $38-50 < $37.99
Industrial & Manufacturing $26.00 $50.00 $50.01+ $38-50 < $37.99
Travel & Tourism $26.00 $50.00 $50.01+ $38-50 < $37.99
Consumer Products $26.00 $50.00 $50.01+ $38-50 < $37.99
Software $51.00 $100.00 $100.01+ $75.50-100 < $75.49
Information Technology and Services $51.00 $100.00 $100.01+ $75.50-100 < $75.49
Marketing Agencies $51.00 $100.00 $100.01+ $75.50-100 < $75.49
Financial Services $51.00 $100.00 $100.01+ $75.50-100 < $75.49
Average/Default $33.73 $65.91 $65.92+ $49.82-$65.91 < $49.81

Conversion, IGRCR, and ROI

“Conversion” corresponds with “Income-Generating Relationship Conversion Rate” in the table. The figure to the right of it illustrates ROI and, in parentheses, burn rate. Conversion and ROI are dependent on variables like budget, spending, and income-generating relationship value (IGRV). As such, there are no best-practice benchmarks for either metric. Using the following as a benchmark:

Your value creation must be at least 3x the amount of cash you burn or you’re wasting investor value. (source)

… we color code all three based on burn rate:

  • ≥ 3x
  • 1.01 – 2.99x
  • ≤ 1x

GoConvert takes a broad view of the term “investor.” Whether or not our customer has true equity investors, an organization’s owners, managers, and workers all invest time in, and add value to, the enterprise. In this sense, one could argue achieving and maintaining a 3x burn is as important for stakeholders as it is for shareholders.

One other note about the way we calculate network ROI and present that data to website visitors.

We populate the front-end data resources on this website according to the following rule:

Only customer installs that have (a) budgets > $0.00 and (b) Income-Generating Relationships worth > $0 are included in the figure.

Regarding the latter, if we didn’t do this, each time we add a new customer to the system, the system’s overall ROI would drop because all new customers have a negative ROI’s since Total Value of Income-Generating Relationships ($0) - BUM ($) = -$x and Total Value of Income-Generating Relationships ($0) / BUM (x/burn) = Undefined.

We realize this has the potential to make the network ROI seem overly positive. In time, however, we may adjust the calculation so that, after 30 or so days of active management, all customer installs (even those with negative ROI’s and IGR values of $0) are included in the ROI output.

Please send feedback and additional questions to info@letsgoconvert.com. We maintain extensive documentation for GoConvert and can provide additional, granular insights upon request.